Keenan Allen Wins PFWA Offensive Rookie of the Year

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Keenan Allen was officially named the 2013 Offensive Rookie of the Year. Allen emerged throughout the year in a Philip Rivers led San Diego offense. He had a tremendous season, and could have easily been considered the overall Rookie of the Year, who went to Green Bay’s Eddie Lacy. Kiko Alonso won the Defensive Rookie of the Year.

Alonso was third in the entire league in tackles (159) and was also able to haul in 4 interceptions as an Inside Linebacker. That is pretty incredible considering he is a rookie.

Eddie Lacy played well in 15 games rushing for 1,178 yards and 11 touchdowns which led all rookies. He also added 35 receptions for 257 yards. Lacy was plugged in as the go-to guy midway through the season after Aaron Rodgers went down with an injury. The Packers leaned heavily on the rushing game during the 7 game stretch. 

Keenan Allen had a fantastic season as well. He led all rookies in receptions (71), receiving yards (1046), and receiving touchdowns (8). He also had five 100-yard games. After the Chargers lost their 1 and 2 Wide Receivers in Danario Alexander and Malcom Floyd, it created an opening for Allen. He really did not get going until Week 5 in Oakland. From there on out he was pretty consistent.

The Charger Opinion:

Generally, it is harder for a receiver to put up as many yards and touchdowns as a running back. Many teams have one go-to running back who accumulates all the yards, while receivers are one among many. Over half of Lacy’s touchdowns were from 5 yards out or less, with more than a few 1-yd TD runs. 

It took about 5 weeks, but Keenan Allen connected with Philip Rivers and became his go-to guy. He was able to consistently get open on crossing routes and corners. Allen was getting matched up against the opponent’s best CB at times, and even getting double teamed. San Diego has a Top-5 Offense with a lot of playmakers. Quarterbacks have to throw it around to more than just one guy. They hand it off to just one. That is the argument.

 

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